The Dirty Little Secret of the Drug and Supplements Industries July 09 2018

 

The tablets, capsules, and pills manufactured by pharmaceutical and nutraceutical companies are supposed to disintegrate so your body can use the active ingredients. But scientific studies have shown that more than half of tablets and capsules do not disintegrate. 1

Why not? These pill companies add excipients and fillers to their products – they are the “glue” which binds together and stabilizes the pill. Historically these glues have been considered inert and without any medicinal benefit – but they influence your body’s ability to use the active ingredients.

Undissolved Pills Can Clog You Up

Noted lecturer and neurologist Dr. David Friedman reports the story of a patient who had to have her septic tank repaired. The tank was clogged with hundreds of undigested vitamin pills – some with the brand names still readable!2

An X-ray taken by the highly respected Mayo Clinic tells a similar story. A woman checked into the hospital complaining of abdominal pain. At first her doctors believed the problem was gallstones – but x-rays showed fifty undissolved pills in the woman’s abdomen. 3

Even “all natural” pills often use fillers, binders and adhesive agents that can inhibit absorption. And even if the pill you’re taking actually disintegrates, these fillers can interfere with your body’s ability to utilize the active ingredients. 4 And if a pill doesn’t disintegrate, its benefit to you is zero.

And as you already learned, even when pills dissolve your body may absorb only 10% of the nutrients! 23 The rest simply passes right through your body.

That means that for every $100 you spend on pills, you are flushing up to $90 down the toilet – literally!

 

 


 

1. Löbenberg R, Steinke W. Investigation of vitamin and mineral tablets and capsules on the Canadian market. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. 2006;9(1):40-49.

2. Friedman D. Liquid Vitamins: The Wave of the Future. Chiropractic Economics Magazine. 1998:36,38,40-41.

3. Florez M, Evans J, Daly T. The Radiodensity of Medications Seen on X-ray Films. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1998;73(6):516-519. doi:10.4065/73.6.516.

4. Jackson K, Young D, Pant S. Drug-excipient interactions and their affect on absorption. Pharmaceutical Science & Technology Today. 2000;3(10):336-345. doi:10.1016/s1461-5347(00)00301-1.